The way it works is quite simple - you choose the desired geo (country you’d like the visitors to come from) and the niche you want them to be interested in. You also choose how many visitors would you like us to deliver to you (the more you order, the more we’ll throw in on top for free) and over how many days would you like us to send them to you. After that - we take over, set your campaign up and open the tap. Using a mix of expired domains, the XML feed and other traffic sources, we direct the targeted visitors straight to your website.
In a very crowded, noisy space – entrepreneurs and small business owners with a ton of “experts and influencers.” How do I get “above the noise?” I have built up a great brand and, I think, some great content based on a boatload of practical, real-life experience. I also have some products and services that I’m trying to sell, but I remain, “all dressed up, with no place to go.” Thoughts?

How much does it cost to bring in a visitor? Some web traffic is free, but many online stores rely on paid traffic — such as PPC or affiliates — to support and grow their business. Cost of Acquiring Customers (CAC) and Cost Per Acquisition (CPA) are arguably the two most important ecommerce metrics. When balanced with AOV (average order value) and CLV (customer lifetime value), a business can assess and adjust its ad spend as necessary.
You have also mentioned Quuu for article sharing and driving traffic. I have been using Quuu for quite sometime now and I don’t think they’re worth it. While the content does get shared a lot, there are hardly any clicks to the site. Even the clicks that are there, average time is like 0.02 seconds compared to more than 2 minutes for other sources of traffic on my website. I have heard a few guys having a similar experience with Quuu and so, I thought should let you know.

“Syndicate carefully: If you syndicate your content on other sites, Google will always show the version we think is most appropriate for users in each given search, which may or may not be the version you’d prefer. However, it is helpful to ensure that each site on which your content is syndicated includes a link back to your original article. You can also ask those who use your syndicated material to use the noindex meta tag to prevent search engines from indexing their version of the content.”


I am new at this. I have been researching keywords and have found a few keyword phrases that nobody in the first page of Google results is even using in their Title Tag or H1 Tag. Some of the companies on the results page have a high pagerank and lots of backlinks. If I optimize for this exact keyword phrase with a new website, would I have much of a chance of getting on the first page eventually?
In a very crowded, noisy space – entrepreneurs and small business owners with a ton of “experts and influencers.” How do I get “above the noise?” I have built up a great brand and, I think, some great content based on a boatload of practical, real-life experience. I also have some products and services that I’m trying to sell, but I remain, “all dressed up, with no place to go.” Thoughts?
He started by finding an offer that resonated with and is relevant to his audience. In his case, his blog was dedicated to teaching people how to use a software called “Sublime Text.” He simply offered a license to the software for the giveaway. By doing this, not only did he increase the chances of success of his giveaway since his incentive was relevant, but he also ensured the quality of subscribers since they were actually people interested in his content. It’s easy to give people an iPad or an iPhone, but how relevant will they be to you at the end of the day?

Here’s a quick pop quiz. True or false: All website traffic is basically the same, so quantity matters more than quality. If you guessed false, you got it right. Not all website traffic is equal. It is better to have fewer hits from people who actually care about your business than scads of traffic from people that will never purchase your product or service. When building website traffic, you need to find the right audience for what you have to offer. One way to do this is by looking at similar websites.

Thanks for sharing these great tips last August! I’ve recently adopted them and I have a question (that’s kind of connected to the last post): how important would promoting content be when using this strategy? For example, through Google Adwords. As I guess that would depend on the circumstances, but I am trying to discover if there’s a ‘formula’ here. Thanks in advance!


Piggy back on the success of others. Create a presence on websites which are highly trafficked. This is beside the Facebooks, the Twitters, and the YouTubes. Figure out the relevant sites in your niche and get yourself linked in there. If you are a music producer, it’s Soundcloud. If you are a Joomla developer, it’s the JED. If you focus on WordPress, it’s the Plugins directory. Find the behemoth in your niche, and piggyback a ride on their success. It's also good to find a niche in your niche. Riding on somebody's success is a guaranteed way of increasing website traffic. Hence the reason people guest post. More on that later.
Be helpful – forget the sales pitch. People want to “solve a problem” – make sure you, your product and your website are focused towards solving a problem – whatever it may be. Whether it’s “What shall I cook tonight?” or “How to increase website traffic” – your social media marketing should all be about solving “Someone Else’s Problem” (a twist on the meaning of the SEP - with apologies to Douglas Adams). At CollectiveRay, our articles do just that.
If a web page is not listed in the first pages of any search, the odds of someone finding it diminishes greatly (especially if there is other competition on the first page). Very few people go past the first page, and the percentage that go to subsequent pages is substantially lower. Consequently, getting proper placement on search engines, a practice known as SEO, is as important as the website itself..[citation needed]
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