Gone are the days when a product page or blog post or two could serve as your sole lead-generation assets for the month. Nowadays, with more and more content on more and more websites, the bar has been raised for both the quality of your content, and the frequency with which you update your site’s content. Quantity applies to generally keeping the interest of your readers, but more importantly, it keeps the search engines fed and happy, and keeps your business coming up in search results.
The Internet is positively riddled with traffic generators. They range from low-quality autorefresh bots using proxies to appear as though they come from around the world, to sophisticated traffic exchange systems powered by real people and real advertising. Ideally, you’ll strike upon the most valuable of these networks when you’re searching, but there’s a few problems.
Web traffic is measured to see the popularity of websites and individual pages or sections within a site. This can be done by viewing the traffic statistics found in the web server log file, an automatically generated list of all the pages served. A hit is generated when any file is served. The page itself is considered a file, but images are also files, thus a page with 5 images could generate 6 hits (the 5 images and the page itself). A page view is generated when a visitor requests any page within the website – a visitor will always generate at least one page view (the main page) but could generate many more. Tracking applications external to the website can record traffic by inserting a small piece of HTML code in every page of the website.[2]
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