Even though traffic is intrinsically tied to conversation rates, it seems that too many people have a lot of misunderstandings regarding the relationship between these two aspects. For one thing, the size of the traffic you get does not matter If it doesn’t lead to the kind of conversion rate you need. If you really want to earn money from the visitors coming to your site, they need to be of high quality.
We should warn you that we can not guarantee the improved performance of your website. How well the visitors from our traffic convert is totally dependent on your website. For starters it depends on what kind of website you have, as you might imagine, a website that sells expensive smartphones would logically have lower conversion rate than a simple online shoe store

Servers are able to compile every request for a web page, arming its operator with the information needed to determine how popular the site is and which pages receive the most attention. When a web server processes a file request, it makes an entry in what is known as the “server log” on the server's hard drive. The log gathers entries across posterity, forming a valuable database of information that the site owner can analyze to better understand the website's visitor activity.


3. Advertise your website using various services available such as Google ads, Facebook ads, and pay per click. Pay per click can be a very option to drive traffic in the form of ads. You can even submit your ads offline like newspaper or an article covering your website, radio local television station if your niche covers that field. You can even advertise using online yellow pages.
These are only some of the many strategies you can use to drive traffic to your website. Getting more website visitors does not happen overnight. It takes hard work and dedication, but we’ve eliminated the hard part for you: knowing what to do in the first place. Implement a mix of these strategies and you’ll start seeing improvements in your website traffic.
Web traffic is the amount of data sent and received by visitors to a website. This necessarily does not include the traffic generated by bots. Since the mid-1990s, web traffic has been the largest portion of Internet traffic.[1] This is determined by the number of visitors and the number of pages they visit. Sites monitor the incoming and outgoing traffic to see which parts or pages of their site are popular and if there are any apparent trends, such as one specific page being viewed mostly by people in a particular country. There are many ways to monitor this traffic and the gathered data is used to help structure sites, highlight security problems or indicate a potential lack of bandwidth.
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